Vol. 30 No. 3 (2020)
Papers

Microfluidic Chip for Trapping Magnetic Nanoparticles and Heating in Terms of Biological Analysis

Tu Le Ngoc
National Psychiatric Hospital No1, Thuong Tin, Hanoi, Vietnam
Thinh Nguyen Cong
Department of Science, Technology and Environment, Ministry of Construction, Vietnam
Lam Dai Tran
Graduate University of Science and Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Hanoi, Vietnam and Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Hanoi, Vietnam
Van-Anh Nguyen
School of Chemical Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 1 Dai Co Viet, Hanoi, Vietnam
Ha Cao Hong
School of Chemical Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 1 Dai Co Viet, Hanoi, Vietnam

Published 22-07-2020

Keywords

  • Microfluidic,
  • planar-coil,
  • magnetic nanoparticles,
  • electromagnet,
  • magnetic field calculation,
  • Polydimethyl-siloxane,
  • ...More
    Less

How to Cite

Le Ngoc, T., Nguyen Cong, T., Tran, L. D., Nguyen, V.-A., & Cao Hong, H. (2020). Microfluidic Chip for Trapping Magnetic Nanoparticles and Heating in Terms of Biological Analysis. Communications in Physics, 30(3), 245. https://doi.org/10.15625/0868-3166/30/3/14834

Abstract

In this study, we reported the results of the design and the fabrication a planar coil in copper (square, a = 10 mm, 15mm high, 90 turns), these planar coils were integrated in a microfluidic chip for trapping magnetic nanoparticles and local heating applications. A small thermocouple (type K, 1 mm tip size) was put directly on top of the micro-channel in poly(dimethyl-siloxane) in order to measure the temperature inside the channel during applying current. The design of planar coils was based on optimizing the results of the magnetic calculation. The most suitable value of the magnetic field generated by the coil was calculated by ANSYS® software corresponded to the different distances from the coil surface to the micro-channel bottom (magnetic field strength Hmax = 825 A/m). The magnetic filed and heating relationship was balanced in order to manipulating the trapping magnetic nanoparticles and heating process. This design of the microfluidic chip can be used to develop a complex microfluidic chip using magnetic nanoparticles.

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