A constructive model of soil bio-cementing by using expanded glass granules

Authors

  • Cong Ly Pham Faculty of Materials Technology, Ho Chi Minh city University of Technology, VNU-HCM, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam
  • Tri Huynh Nguyen Ngoc Faculty of Materials Technology, Ho Chi Minh city University of Technology, VNU-HCM, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam
  • Huong Huyen Nguyen Pham Department of Biotechnology, Ho Chi Minh City University of Food Industry, 140 Le TrongTan, Tay Thanh Ward, Tan Phu District, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam
  • Khanh Son Nguyen Faculty of Materials Technology, Ho Chi Minh city University of Technology, VNU-HCM, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15625/2525-2518/16357

Keywords:

soil cementing, biomineralization, bacteria, MICP

Abstract

Soil bio-cementing is a promising technique for ground stabilization and/or production of unfired clay brick using bacteria. This study reported new findings using Sporosarcina pasteurii, a ureolytic baterium and a mixture of perfect particle package of expanded glass granules as a soil model. For bacteria growth, the nutrition solution was carefully prepared in the laboratory condition from different indigents such as casein, soymeal, NaCl, urea and CaCl2. Three mixtures containing large, medium and small granules were analyzed with regards to its compactness. As constated, round shape and high water absorption of glass granules helps us providing an ideal condition for biomineralization process. Precipitated products responsible for bonding glass beads were characterized with different techniques such as XRD, SEM. Calcium carbonate was regconized as the main generated product due to bacteria metabolism. Results of microscopic observation revealed the various position of bonding bridges between glass granules that placed side by side on petri dish and in the cylindrical mold. Obviously, the effect of curing time on the result of bonding materials was observed as a decisive factor for 7 and 21 days specimens. The model of soil particle packing from glass granules help us more easily to investigate the cementing ability of bacteria. From this study, we could consider future studies of soil biocementing with different strains of bacteria.

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Author Biography

Khanh Son Nguyen, Faculty of Materials Technology, Ho Chi Minh city University of Technology, VNU-HCM, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam

Tiến sỹ , Giảng viên Bộ môn Kỹ thuật vật liệu - Đại học Bách Khoa Tp.HCM

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https://stikloporas.com/expanded-glass, (Accessed in May. 2020)

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Published

2022-03-22

How to Cite

[1]
C. L. Pham, T. H. N. Ngoc, H. H. N. Pham, and K. S. Nguyen, “A constructive model of soil bio-cementing by using expanded glass granules”, Vietnam J. Sci. Technol., vol. 59, no. 6A, pp. 115–124, Mar. 2022.

Issue

Section

International Symposium on Materials Science and Engineering - ISMSE