Changes in sedimentary environment at Kim Son coastal plain - Ninh Binh, North Vietnam

Authors

  • Vu Van Ha Institute of Geological Sciences, VAST, Vietnam Graduate University of Science and Technology, VAST, Vietnam
  • Nguyen Minh Quang Institute of Geological Sciences, VAST, Vietnam Graduate University of Science and Technology, VAST, Vietnam
  • Pham Quang Son Institute of Geological Sciences, VAST, Vietnam
  • To Xuan Ban Hanoi University of Mining and Geology, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Tran Ngoc Dien Department of Marine Geology and Minerals - General Department of Geology and Mineral of Viet Nam, Vietnam
  • Mai Thanh Tan Institute of Geological Sciences, VAST, Vietnam
  • Nguyen Thi Thu Cuc VNU University of Science, Vietnam
  • Dang Minh Tuan Institute of Geological Sciences, VAST, Vietnam Graduate University of Science and Technology, VAST, Vietnam
  • Nguyen Thi Min Institute of Geological Sciences, VAST, Vietnam
  • Dang Xuan Tung Institute of Geological Sciences, VAST, Vietnam
  • Le Tuan Dat Publishing House for Science and Technology,VAST, Vietnam
  • Hoang Van Tha Institute of Geological Sciences, VAST, Vietnam
  • Giap Thi Kim Chi Institute of Geological Sciences, VAST, Vietnam

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15625/1859-3097/15685

Abstract

Kim Son coastal plain is a part of the Red River Delta located between Day and Can rivers. Over the past
55 years, Kim Son coastal plain has been the region with the highest accretion rate in the Red River Delta. This study aims to clarify the sediment characteristics of Kim Son coastal plain. It has the structure of a typical tidal flat and a relatively straightforward tide-influenced sedimentary structure evidenced by the field observation, sampling 70 hand-drilled boreholes, borehole logging and analyzing 177 samples of grain size. There are three tidal sedimentary zones to be identified, including sand flat, mixed flat, and mudflat. The history of topographic changes is also presented over six periods from 1965 to 2020 based on analyzing and interpreting multi-time satellite images. The total accretion area of Kim Son coastal plain over 55 years was 4,081.2 ha.

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References

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Published

30-03-2021

How to Cite

Ha, V. V., Quang, N. M., Son, P. Q., Ban, T. X., Dien, T. N., Tan, M. T., Cuc, N. T. T., Tuan, D. M., Min, N. T., Tung, D. X., Dat, L. T., Tha, H. V., & Chi, G. T. K. (2021). Changes in sedimentary environment at Kim Son coastal plain - Ninh Binh, North Vietnam. Vietnam Journal of Marine Science and Technology, 21(1), 1–11. https://doi.org/10.15625/1859-3097/15685

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